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Additional Charters 1— The Catalogues of Additional Charters are manuscript calendars, which are handwritten summaries of the contents of these charters and rolls in 38 volumes. There are also brief descriptions of Additional Charters — in the Catalogue of Additions for accessions — Additional Charters onwards. Summary descriptions of these charters can be found in the Catalogue of Additions for accessions onwards.

Additional Charters — Shrewsbury or Talbot Deeds. In addition to the summary descriptions in the Catalogues of Additions , there are detailed typewritten descriptions in 9 volumes. A card index to personal names 10 boxes and places 1 box by Edith S. Scroggs can be consulted on request.

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A handwritten concordance from the Scroggs numbers to the Additional Charters numbers is also available. Egerton Charters 1— The Catalogue of Egerton Charters features handwritten summaries of these charters and rolls in 2 volumes. There are also brief descriptions of Egerton Charters — in the Catalogues of Additions for accessions — Egerton Charters onwards. Summary descriptions of these charters can be found in the Catalogues of Additions for accessions onwards. Harley Charters are numbered 43 A 1— I The Catalogues of Harley Charters are in 7 volumes.

Harley Rolls are numbered A 1—DD 5. Handwritten summary descriptions can be found in a volume combined with Sloane charter descriptions and another copy in a volume combined with other charter collection descriptions. Handwritten summary descriptions can be found in a volume combined with Royal Charter descriptions, and another copy in a volume combined with other charter collection descriptions. The Lansdowne Charters and Rolls are numbered 1— Handwritten summary descriptions can be found in a volume combined with descriptions of Topham charters.

The Stowe Charters are numbered 1—, and are described in the Catalogue of Stowe Manuscripts , 2 vols, — The descriptions in the former supersede the descriptions of the latter. A volume of handwritten descriptions is available. These descriptions supersede the handwritten descriptions of which there are two copies, one combined with Cotton Charter descriptions, the other combined with various charter collections. There are two copies of handwritten descriptions, one combined with descriptions of other charter collections.

Note that the latter of the two lists omits the last two charters. Topham Charters are numbered 1— There are handwritten descriptions in a volume which also includes Lansdowne Charter descriptions. There is a volume of handwritten descriptions but note that they are entered there by regnal year, e. The references added in pencil, e. The regnal year may also appear on the item when it is delivered. The Index to Charters and Rolls in the Department of Manuscripts , British Museum, 2 vols, —12, also known as the Index Locorum , covers all of the collections listed above although Additional and Egerton Charters are included for accessions to only, that is, to Add Ch and Eg Ch but for British place names only.

The Index of Manuscripts in the British Library , 10 vols, —86, includes the Index Locorum described above, and also includes the indexing of places for Additional and Egerton Charters from the Catalogue of Additions to accessions. For later accessions to the Additional and Egerton Charter collections, the later Catalogues of Additions should be consulted. The indexes of British place names in the handwritten catalogues of the Egerton, Additional to vol. VI , Lansdowne, Topham, and Wolley Charters described above have been superseded by the Index Locorum , but can still be useful for foreign place names.

In the departmental archives is a handwritten slip index to foreign charters which according to the introduction to volume 2 of the published Index Locorum , would have constituted the third volume. This is not yet available to readers. The Index Nominum of charters in 69 volumes, which consists of photocopies of handwritten slips, is in two series which correspond to the two volumes of the Index Locorum , except that it includes both British and Foreign charters.

The Index of Manuscripts in the British Library does not include the Index Nominum , but does provide references to names of persons in charters to the very limited extent that these are included in the indexes of the published catalogues for accessions to For later accessions the later Catalogues of Additions should be consulted.

The handwritten catalogue of the Additional Charters and Rolls including up to volume vi, an index of persons and places for Additional Charters to The handwritten catalogue of the Egerton Charters and Rolls includes an index of persons and places, but only up to Egerton Charter The handwritten catalogue of the Lansdowne Charters and Rolls includes an index of persons and places.

The second of the two handwritten catalogues of Wolley Charters, described above, includes an index of persons and places. Anglo-Saxon charters and wills have been fully catalogued and indexed in P. There is also a slip index to Anglo-Saxon charters in the departmental archives.

It is superseded by Sawyer and not available to readers. An electronic, searchable version of Sawyer is available online. III, , is a catalogue with index of charters relating to Wales. An early attempt by Samuel Ayscough to catalogue and index the charter collection, completed in , survives in manuscript and is now Add MSS — Although the first three volumes have no indexes, there is a handwritten Index of Seals see below. Please note that the catalogue entry in bold numbers to the left of the entry for each seal should not be used when referring to or requesting seals.

The collection name should be written Seal, followed by the Roman numerals and numbers between square brackets after the entry for the seal. If the seal is attached to a charter, the full charter reference will be given between the square brackets.


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A handwritten Catalogue of Detached Seals in the Department of Manuscripts , with an index to persons and places, is available. It contains descriptions of:. There is a volume containing handwritten descriptions of them, with an index to persons and places, which reads on the spine H. Doubleday Casts, sometimes abbreviated D. A 1—D. H There are also two volumes of handwritten descriptions of them, one entitled John Doubleday, Collection of Casts of Seals , with an index, and the other British Museum Catalogue of Doubleday Casts , without an index.

The former supersedes the latter, the cast numbers in which should not be used. Both include references to Cotton and Harley Charters from which some of the casts were taken. I ; Personal Seals , vol. II ; Monastic Seals , vol. I MS Facs. Bond, ed. Contains facsimiles and transcripts of all Charters written in England before the Norman Conquest acquired up to , and an index to persons and places in volume 4. Warner and H. Valentine's Day at the Post-Office.

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Dickens probably wrote the following portions of 'Valentine's Day at the Post-Office': from 'Here huge slits' to 'paid letters' p. Dickens may also have rewritten or added to the following passages: from 'The mysterious visitors' to 'Sundays excepted! In addition, Dickens seems to have added touches to sections primarily by Wills. This work, now virtually unobtainable, contained thirty-seven pieces collected from Household Words : twenty-two by Wills, and fifteen by Dickens and Wills including, in the latter category, 'Valentine's Day at the Post-Office'.

Wills was not attempting to take credit for Dickens' work. He freely acknowledged Dickens' share in the book, but - very likely on Dickens' orders - did not mention Dickens' name. Instead he dedicated the volume to 'THE OTHER HAND, whose masterly touches gave to the OLD LEAVES here freshly gathered, their brightest tints,' and he marked all the collaborative articles with a printer's hand, indicating that 'portions of the papers distinguished throughout the volume by this mark are by another hand' in every case the label agrees with the designation in the Contributors' Book.

He also changed the text. He reprinted some of the pieces, such as 'Valentine's Day at the Post-Office,' virtually unchanged, but he peppered most of the articles with hundreds of minor emendations. In collaborative pieces, his usual practice seems to have been to emend his own sections very freely, Dickens' reworkings less freely, and Dickens' solo portions - with a few trivial and explainable exceptions - not at all. In certain instances, also, he reparagraphed passages in order to separate Dickens' work from his own.

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As a consequence, Wills' emendations often provide strong additional evidence for establishing Dickens' share in their joint articles. Such evidence has been used throughout [Stone's edition] to help make the Dickens-Wills attributions. Concerning one segment of Wills' portion of this article, Dickens wrote 12 March : 'My objection to entering into the Sunday [delivery of mail] business is, that whatever we state, is sure to be contradicted; and I observed Rowland Hill to be a very cautious and reserved man, whom I should strongly doubt as to his backing qualities in such a case.

If the passage stand at all, I should wish it to stand as I have altered it. But I should be glad if you would show it to Forster, as a casting opinion. We will abide by his black or white ball.

Detailed record for Harley 4431

Concerning another segment of Wills' portion of this article, Dickens wrote 28 February : 'I think the addresses I enclose in this, the best. I would certainly give all these in the article.

If you have a fac-simile of any, I recommend Valparaiso'. Dickens' suggestions illustrate how he supervised what his collaborators wrote. Through such suggestions, and through many similar devices, he shaped and controlled what he assigned to others. Dickens called such pieces 'process' articles.

He wrote some process articles himself and collaborated on many others. DJO gratefully acknowledges permission to reproduce this material. Abraham and the Fire-Worshipper. The Amusements of the People [i]. Dickens wrote or co-wrote three pieces for the first number of his new journal. I, 30 March ], written with his sub-editor W.

It relates directly to one aspect of the editorial project announced in Dickens's 'Preliminary Word' in that it is concerned with the cultivation of the imagination, cherishing 'that light of Fancy which is inherent in the human breast. An Incident in the Life of Mademoiselle Clairon. A Bundle of Emigrants' Letters. Dickens wrote all of this article with the exception of the letters themselves, the latter being supplied by Mrs.

Caroline Chisholm. A few weeks before the first issue of Household Words appeared, Mrs. Herbert arranged a meeting between Dickens and Mrs.